Invisible City Productions Invisible City Productions is a collective of game designers, writers, and artists who provide this as a space for the creators of secret media to come together and touch antennae.

Invisible City Productions Invisible City Productions is a collective of game designers, writers, and artists who provide this as a space for the creators of secret media to come together and touch antennae.

Contact Us

Recent Posts
Jonathan A. Leistiko
Jeremy P. Bushnell
Alakazam
Alakazam: Game of the month for August 2015
Power Up! Jewel Thieves: Game of the Month for July 2015

Recent Comments
Shana Rosenberg (BAG)
Kat (Miscellaneous Halloween Thoughts...)
Derek (MetalTalon)
Jon Paulsen (Cthul-B-Que)
A!ex (Fantasy RPG Checkers)

Copyright 1999 - 2010 Invisible City Productions

Published with Textpattern

Web Hosting by A2 Hosting

browse

search

RSS / Atom

Invisible City Productions

Un-Sticky Notes: I'm sharing a secret tool with you... · 20 June 12

Hi There!

It’s been a while since I’ve been here. Have you missed me? I’ve missed you too.

Happily, I’ve brought you a gift. It’s a special tool I use when I’m feeling stuck. They’re called Un-Sticky Notes.

Un-Sticky Notes are cards designed to help you get past a mental block when designing a game. Print out and cut up the cards and keep them nearby when you’re designing. When you’re feeling flummoxed, draw a card and see where it takes you. Un-Sticky Notes target board game designers, but can apply to computer game designers as well as other creative projects.

Un-Sticky Notes owes its genesis in part to the Oblique Strategies deck.

Enjoy!

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: epiphanies : novelties

Share Ideas

How To Steal Like an Artist · 4 May 11

Just read the on-line version of a very clever presentation titled How To Steal Like an Artist.

I mention it here because I liked it a lot. Also because the philosophy and stance behind this presentation is very similar to what inspired me to design and post 120 games in 120 months here at Invisible City. It’s also what inspired me to launch Protospiel South (Coming up on May 27, 28, 29!) and is driving me to write a book on game design.

That’s all. Just wanted to share…

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: epiphanies : thought

Share Ideas

SJG Week 8: Targeting your game at a publisher... · 1 May 10

When I sat down to write this week’s notes, I thought I hadn’t really learned very much. My starting outline looked like this:

Brainstorming – Taking notes, listening, capturing info, etc.
Being the good guy – Project X (Not the real name of the project, of course.)
Targeting – Do your research! Steve Jackson: Lego dinosaurs. Project X: An elegant, engaging mechanic.

…and I started at the end, writing about targeting your game submissions at the correct publishers. 45 minutes later, there’s the formidable screed below. I suppose that means I’ll save the bits on brainstorming and being the good guy for another week.

That said, let’s discuss targeting…

Targeting –
There’s a thread on the designers’ forum at Board Game Geek that started as a designer sharing his joy and fear about sending his first prototype to a publisher. The discussion has flirted with evolving into an analysis of the game and how to make it, “less dry.” My contact with the designer of “Project X”, looking at the past submissions (accepted and declined) at SJG, thinking about how I submitted games to publishers, and learning about what games have and have not been accepted at SJG… All of these have me thinking about targeting your game submissions. I suggest the following:

Note that some of these suggestions overlap with ones I made earlier. That’s kind of inevitable, I suppose.

1) Do your research on the company.
It’s not enough to simply find out if they accept unsolicited submissions or not. Look at their past and current product line. Play at least a few of their games, if you can. Only contact the publisher if you think your game is a good mechanical and thematic fit for their company.

2) Dissect and deconstruct your game. Figure out what makes it stand out from the other games. Distill that into one sentence. Figure out what makes it most appealing to produce, from a publisher’s stance. Distill that into another sentence. Use these sentences whenever you can: In the cover letter, on your sell-sheet mock ups, on the prototype box…

3) Do even more research – this time, on the people in the company.
Everyone has favorite things – favorite mechanics, favorite themes, favorite components, etc… Find out who’s going to receive your game, or who the ultimate decision maker is in the company. Learn what that person’s favorite things are. If your game includes one or more of those things, that increases your chances of getting accepted.

Note: I’m not under any illusions about how difficult it is to do this. It’s hecka-hard, but it is not impossible. Go to conventions – especially industry-only conventions like GTS – and hang out with people in the business. Find your target and offer to buy them dinner or a drink, then have a casual and friendly conversation. I know it sounds hard to do, but it’s getting to the convention that’s hard. Politely asking someone to share their knowledge is easy by comparison.

Also, use the power of the internet to research your target. Look for blogs written by the people you’re targeting. Using Steve Jackson as an example, it’s not hard to find personal thoughts and notes he’s written, or to find articles about things he’s participated in recently and in the past. Given what I’ve learned, if someone made a Lego game about dinosaur pirates in the SCA (however preposterous it may sound), it’d have a leg up on the competition at SJG. (Note: SJG is not accepting submissions right now. Do not send a submission. All unsolicited submissions will be placed in the circular file or returned if an SASE is included.)

…The following notes are for when you send your game to the publisher…

4) Include your design notes!
This is something I wish-wish-wish I’d done for every prototype I sent. You wouldn’t send a prototype off without the rules, right? Of course not. Without them, people can’t learn how to play the game! Your design notes serve an equally important role for a publisher. They tell the publisher why you made the decisions you made. They tell the publisher that you’ve already considered the ramifications of what will happen if they change X, Y, or Z. They prove to the publisher that you’ve really worked on the game.

You are keeping design notes, right?

5) Include your playtest notes!
I wish I’d done this too, for very similar reasons. These prove that you’ve playtested your game, recorded the feedback, and how you incorporated that feedback into the game.

If you haven’t playtested your game, strongly reconsider sending it to a publisher. Playtesting is vital. It uncovers a million little flaws that are entirely invisible to you. Do it now, while you can still address and correct each flaw. If you don’t, the publisher will find each and every flaw during their playtest. You don’t want that to happen.

6) Include any special supporting tools you created to design the game.
Do you have a special spreadsheet that helps you automagically balance out point costs? Include it. Did you create a program that helps you randomly generate room tiles? Include it. Not only do these things show how much work you’ve done and how much you’ve thought about the game, they let the publisher know that these tools are available to them (making their job all the easier) if they choose to develop and publish the game.

7) Make a “how to play” or a “about the game” movie.
Two years ago or more, when I first heard about a publisher requiring a movie with every game, I freaked out and got all indignant. “What do you mean I gotta make a, ‘how to play,” video? I’m already designing the game, playtesting it, laying out the rules and components, creating the prototype, researching publishers, and maintaining a contact list! Now I have to master video production as well??? Gaaah!”

I’ve changed my tune, and it’s not because of working at SJG. It’s because of the Kickstarter project Jeremy and I created for Inevitable. If you go there, you’ll see the pitch video Jeremy and I created to encourage donors to pledge. Our Kickstarter project is much more effective for having that video than it would have been without it. Videos are not only a very effective way to convey complex game concepts, but they allow you to connect with the viewer in a personal way that writing does not.

On making the video: Relatively speaking, it wasn’t that hard. I’m using a fairly modern iBook running OS X 10.6. I used iPhoto, Garage Band, and iMovie to make the video. iPhoto, Garage Band, and iMovie are all part of the iLife suite, which costs $80. That’s a powerful tool suite that’s super-cheap. It also takes technical actions (audio and video editing) and makes them tremendously accessible. I’ll grant that I was an Apple tech support agent for 6+ years, but I’ve never had any video-oriented training. That’s why there’s no “real live action” footage in the video. It’s more like a slide show than a video, really. Still, it gets its point across just fine. If you’re computer-competent, and you’re willing to put firth a little effort, you can make a video. I guarantee that it’ll make your submission stand out from the others. Y’know how many of the submissions I’ve seen at SJG have demo videos? None.

Okay. Steps 4, 5, 6, and 7 were less about targeting and more about good game development, making your game submission stand out, and increasing your chances of getting your submission accepted by a publisher. That’s okay, I suppose. The advice is still valid. It’s also worth noting that I never followed those last four pieces of advice when I sent submissions to publishers. I truly and sincerely wish I had. If I had that advice four years ago, I bet I’d have more games under contract today.

Two more things:

1) Yesterday I was in the “Hotness” list on Board Game Geek! I was designer #13, just six steps below Matt Leacock, my current game designer idol. Woot! (Today I’m not even on there. I tell you, people are so fickle!)

2) Protospiel South 2010 is coming together nicely. I have to go raise the pre-registration price to normal pricing, but a three-day pass is just $30 – cheap! If you’re going to be in Austin, TX on Memorial Day Weekend (28, 29, and 30), I strongly recommend dropping in. I think it’s going to be very productive.

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: epiphanies : gaming

Share Ideas [1]

Cheater's Game: Game of the Month for January '09 · 31 December 08

They say that cheaters never win. Prove them wrong in this game for three to five unscrupulous would-be financial barons.

Cheater’s Game is a simple competitive game with a simple goal: End the tenth round with the highest score. Your score consists of two types of points: honest points and points you have from cheater’s alliances. Honest points are completely risk-free, but they’re harder to accumulate. Cheater’s alliance points are easy to accumulate, and accumulate faster when you have many players in your alliance. However, any member of an alliance can turn the other members of the alliance in and take the points, adding them to their honest score. So the question is, “How far you trust a group of self-admitted cheaters?”

Cheater’s Game uses about five standard six-sided dice, two point trackers, a turn tracker, player score pawns, and several sets of cheater’s alliance pawns.

The rules are available at: http://www.invisible-city.com/play/508

The trackers and pawns you need to play are all available as a 284 KB PDF.

Cheater’s Game has fairly simple rules, but complex psychosocial dynamics. You could play it with children as young as 6 or 7, and use it as a tool for teaching ethical and social lessons. I think that Cheater’s Game is appropriate for ages 12 and up without adult supervision. A 4-player game takes about 45 minutes to play.

PS: Although it’s probably obvious, we at Invisible City do not encourage or endorse cheating – especially when your success comes at the expense of others. This game is meant to help children understand recent events where adults in high-profile, high-responsibility occupations did bad things. This game is also an exploration of a possible way to reduce the appeal of cheating.

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: gaming : epiphanies

Share Ideas [2]

Counterfactual history idea: The USA & Russia allied · 14 June 08

I really enjoy the occasional counterfactual history (aka: alternate history) story. It’s a blending of history and conjecture that really gets my creative wheels spinning. Lots of counterfactual histories focus on the obvious topics: Germany winning WWII, the South winning the American Civil War, etc… They’re often pretty war-focused and negative. I suppose that’s because that’s where the conflict and action is, right?

Well, I just thought of a neat counterfactual history premise that I haven’t seen done yet, and I think it’d be neat. What if the USA and Russia remained close allies after WWI instead of starting the Cold War? They could collaborate on global stability, space exploration, moon landings, and more. I think it would have been a really nice alternate reality to live in.

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: epiphanies : thought

Share Ideas [2]

Insight into Wonder Woman from her creator. · 24 August 06

The Evil Inc. blog pointed at this review of the creation of Wonder Woman. The interview includes multiple direct quotes from Wonder Woman creator William Moulton Marston. Turns out that WMM (a psychologist) was using the Wonder Woman comic as a vehicle for a message: Marston believed that submission to “loving authority” was the key to overcoming mankind’s violent urges.

I don’t want to spoil the rest of the article, but let’s just say it gets even more interesting from there…

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: epiphanies

This series makes me miss playing role-playing games. · 17 August 06

While checking out RPG.net’s homepage I spotted a series called, Keeping Kosher. I read article #25: Player Pet Peeves, article #23: Using Props, and article #21: Classroom Management. They’re just chock-full of good advice, and they reminded me of what I really like about playing RPGs.

If I just had the time to do it on a regular basis again…

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: gaming : epiphanies

Juggernauts - Game of the Month for August '06 · 7 August 06

The Game of the Month for August 2006 is Juggernauts. Juggernauts is a non-collectible, customizable card game for two players. You’re the Commander of a massive, sprawling, dynamically reconfigurable battle platform. Your goal is to use your Juggernaut to defend your territory by incapacitating your opponent’s Juggernaut so your ground forces can approach it safely and overwhelm it.

Juggenrauts uses custom cards (which you can downlaod from us for free, of course), assorted tokens, and polyhedral dice. A two-player game takes about 30 minutes to play. Juggernauts is appropriate for ages 12 and up.

Juggernauts is different from our usual offerings for three reasons:

1) Because Juggernauts is a customizable card game, there are many different possible strategies. You can build a Juggernaut that’s small and quick (and fragile) or large and slow (and robust). You can build a Juggernaut that has lots of powerful attacks, strong defenses, specialized crew and deployment forces, electromagnetic neutralizers, chained effect triggers… There are lots of deck construction options.

2) Because Juggernauts is non-collectible, you can print out as many cards and build as many decks as you want to.

3) Because Juggernauts is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License, you can make up new cards and create effects that no-one has ever seen before. I know it’s tempting to make uber-powerful cards, but keep in mind that if your cards are cheesy, no-one’ll want to duel you again (or they might just copy your cards and use them against you). If you make up cards that are super-keen, please let me know about ‘em; if we get enough new cards, we’ll create a page of “officially sanctioned” Juggernauts cards so you can know what’s kosher.

Enjoy!

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: gaming : epiphanies

My favorite self-contradictory statement... · 29 May 06

My favorite self-contradictory statement is, “All generalizations are wrong.” Get it?

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: humor : epiphanies

Older | recent posts | recent comments |

August Game of the Month:

Un-Sticky Notes: I'm sharing a secret tool with you... · 20 June 12

Hi There!

It’s been a while since I’ve been here. Have you missed me? I’ve missed you too.

Happily, I’ve brought you a gift. It’s a special tool I use when I’m feeling stuck. They’re called Un-Sticky Notes.

Un-Sticky Notes are cards designed to help you get past a mental block when designing a game. Print out and cut up the cards and keep them nearby when you’re designing. When you’re feeling flummoxed, draw a card and see where it takes you. Un-Sticky Notes target board game designers, but can apply to computer game designers as well as other creative projects.

Un-Sticky Notes owes its genesis in part to the Oblique Strategies deck.

Enjoy!

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: epiphanies : novelties

Share Ideas

How To Steal Like an Artist · 4 May 11

Just read the on-line version of a very clever presentation titled How To Steal Like an Artist.

I mention it here because I liked it a lot. Also because the philosophy and stance behind this presentation is very similar to what inspired me to design and post 120 games in 120 months here at Invisible City. It’s also what inspired me to launch Protospiel South (Coming up on May 27, 28, 29!) and is driving me to write a book on game design.

That’s all. Just wanted to share…

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: epiphanies : thought

Share Ideas

SJG Week 8: Targeting your game at a publisher... · 1 May 10

When I sat down to write this week’s notes, I thought I hadn’t really learned very much. My starting outline looked like this:

Brainstorming – Taking notes, listening, capturing info, etc.
Being the good guy – Project X (Not the real name of the project, of course.)
Targeting – Do your research! Steve Jackson: Lego dinosaurs. Project X: An elegant, engaging mechanic.

…and I started at the end, writing about targeting your game submissions at the correct publishers. 45 minutes later, there’s the formidable screed below. I suppose that means I’ll save the bits on brainstorming and being the good guy for another week.

That said, let’s discuss targeting…

Targeting –
There’s a thread on the designers’ forum at Board Game Geek that started as a designer sharing his joy and fear about sending his first prototype to a publisher. The discussion has flirted with evolving into an analysis of the game and how to make it, “less dry.” My contact with the designer of “Project X”, looking at the past submissions (accepted and declined) at SJG, thinking about how I submitted games to publishers, and learning about what games have and have not been accepted at SJG… All of these have me thinking about targeting your game submissions. I suggest the following:

Note that some of these suggestions overlap with ones I made earlier. That’s kind of inevitable, I suppose.

1) Do your research on the company.
It’s not enough to simply find out if they accept unsolicited submissions or not. Look at their past and current product line. Play at least a few of their games, if you can. Only contact the publisher if you think your game is a good mechanical and thematic fit for their company.

2) Dissect and deconstruct your game. Figure out what makes it stand out from the other games. Distill that into one sentence. Figure out what makes it most appealing to produce, from a publisher’s stance. Distill that into another sentence. Use these sentences whenever you can: In the cover letter, on your sell-sheet mock ups, on the prototype box…

3) Do even more research – this time, on the people in the company.
Everyone has favorite things – favorite mechanics, favorite themes, favorite components, etc… Find out who’s going to receive your game, or who the ultimate decision maker is in the company. Learn what that person’s favorite things are. If your game includes one or more of those things, that increases your chances of getting accepted.

Note: I’m not under any illusions about how difficult it is to do this. It’s hecka-hard, but it is not impossible. Go to conventions – especially industry-only conventions like GTS – and hang out with people in the business. Find your target and offer to buy them dinner or a drink, then have a casual and friendly conversation. I know it sounds hard to do, but it’s getting to the convention that’s hard. Politely asking someone to share their knowledge is easy by comparison.

Also, use the power of the internet to research your target. Look for blogs written by the people you’re targeting. Using Steve Jackson as an example, it’s not hard to find personal thoughts and notes he’s written, or to find articles about things he’s participated in recently and in the past. Given what I’ve learned, if someone made a Lego game about dinosaur pirates in the SCA (however preposterous it may sound), it’d have a leg up on the competition at SJG. (Note: SJG is not accepting submissions right now. Do not send a submission. All unsolicited submissions will be placed in the circular file or returned if an SASE is included.)

…The following notes are for when you send your game to the publisher…

4) Include your design notes!
This is something I wish-wish-wish I’d done for every prototype I sent. You wouldn’t send a prototype off without the rules, right? Of course not. Without them, people can’t learn how to play the game! Your design notes serve an equally important role for a publisher. They tell the publisher why you made the decisions you made. They tell the publisher that you’ve already considered the ramifications of what will happen if they change X, Y, or Z. They prove to the publisher that you’ve really worked on the game.

You are keeping design notes, right?

5) Include your playtest notes!
I wish I’d done this too, for very similar reasons. These prove that you’ve playtested your game, recorded the feedback, and how you incorporated that feedback into the game.

If you haven’t playtested your game, strongly reconsider sending it to a publisher. Playtesting is vital. It uncovers a million little flaws that are entirely invisible to you. Do it now, while you can still address and correct each flaw. If you don’t, the publisher will find each and every flaw during their playtest. You don’t want that to happen.

6) Include any special supporting tools you created to design the game.
Do you have a special spreadsheet that helps you automagically balance out point costs? Include it. Did you create a program that helps you randomly generate room tiles? Include it. Not only do these things show how much work you’ve done and how much you’ve thought about the game, they let the publisher know that these tools are available to them (making their job all the easier) if they choose to develop and publish the game.

7) Make a “how to play” or a “about the game” movie.
Two years ago or more, when I first heard about a publisher requiring a movie with every game, I freaked out and got all indignant. “What do you mean I gotta make a, ‘how to play,” video? I’m already designing the game, playtesting it, laying out the rules and components, creating the prototype, researching publishers, and maintaining a contact list! Now I have to master video production as well??? Gaaah!”

I’ve changed my tune, and it’s not because of working at SJG. It’s because of the Kickstarter project Jeremy and I created for Inevitable. If you go there, you’ll see the pitch video Jeremy and I created to encourage donors to pledge. Our Kickstarter project is much more effective for having that video than it would have been without it. Videos are not only a very effective way to convey complex game concepts, but they allow you to connect with the viewer in a personal way that writing does not.

On making the video: Relatively speaking, it wasn’t that hard. I’m using a fairly modern iBook running OS X 10.6. I used iPhoto, Garage Band, and iMovie to make the video. iPhoto, Garage Band, and iMovie are all part of the iLife suite, which costs $80. That’s a powerful tool suite that’s super-cheap. It also takes technical actions (audio and video editing) and makes them tremendously accessible. I’ll grant that I was an Apple tech support agent for 6+ years, but I’ve never had any video-oriented training. That’s why there’s no “real live action” footage in the video. It’s more like a slide show than a video, really. Still, it gets its point across just fine. If you’re computer-competent, and you’re willing to put firth a little effort, you can make a video. I guarantee that it’ll make your submission stand out from the others. Y’know how many of the submissions I’ve seen at SJG have demo videos? None.

Okay. Steps 4, 5, 6, and 7 were less about targeting and more about good game development, making your game submission stand out, and increasing your chances of getting your submission accepted by a publisher. That’s okay, I suppose. The advice is still valid. It’s also worth noting that I never followed those last four pieces of advice when I sent submissions to publishers. I truly and sincerely wish I had. If I had that advice four years ago, I bet I’d have more games under contract today.

Two more things:

1) Yesterday I was in the “Hotness” list on Board Game Geek! I was designer #13, just six steps below Matt Leacock, my current game designer idol. Woot! (Today I’m not even on there. I tell you, people are so fickle!)

2) Protospiel South 2010 is coming together nicely. I have to go raise the pre-registration price to normal pricing, but a three-day pass is just $30 – cheap! If you’re going to be in Austin, TX on Memorial Day Weekend (28, 29, and 30), I strongly recommend dropping in. I think it’s going to be very productive.

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: epiphanies : gaming

Share Ideas [1]

Cheater's Game: Game of the Month for January '09 · 31 December 08

They say that cheaters never win. Prove them wrong in this game for three to five unscrupulous would-be financial barons.

Cheater’s Game is a simple competitive game with a simple goal: End the tenth round with the highest score. Your score consists of two types of points: honest points and points you have from cheater’s alliances. Honest points are completely risk-free, but they’re harder to accumulate. Cheater’s alliance points are easy to accumulate, and accumulate faster when you have many players in your alliance. However, any member of an alliance can turn the other members of the alliance in and take the points, adding them to their honest score. So the question is, “How far you trust a group of self-admitted cheaters?”

Cheater’s Game uses about five standard six-sided dice, two point trackers, a turn tracker, player score pawns, and several sets of cheater’s alliance pawns.

The rules are available at: http://www.invisible-city.com/play/508

The trackers and pawns you need to play are all available as a 284 KB PDF.

Cheater’s Game has fairly simple rules, but complex psychosocial dynamics. You could play it with children as young as 6 or 7, and use it as a tool for teaching ethical and social lessons. I think that Cheater’s Game is appropriate for ages 12 and up without adult supervision. A 4-player game takes about 45 minutes to play.

PS: Although it’s probably obvious, we at Invisible City do not encourage or endorse cheating – especially when your success comes at the expense of others. This game is meant to help children understand recent events where adults in high-profile, high-responsibility occupations did bad things. This game is also an exploration of a possible way to reduce the appeal of cheating.

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: gaming : epiphanies

Share Ideas [2]

Counterfactual history idea: The USA & Russia allied · 14 June 08

I really enjoy the occasional counterfactual history (aka: alternate history) story. It’s a blending of history and conjecture that really gets my creative wheels spinning. Lots of counterfactual histories focus on the obvious topics: Germany winning WWII, the South winning the American Civil War, etc… They’re often pretty war-focused and negative. I suppose that’s because that’s where the conflict and action is, right?

Well, I just thought of a neat counterfactual history premise that I haven’t seen done yet, and I think it’d be neat. What if the USA and Russia remained close allies after WWI instead of starting the Cold War? They could collaborate on global stability, space exploration, moon landings, and more. I think it would have been a really nice alternate reality to live in.

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: epiphanies : thought

Share Ideas [2]

Insight into Wonder Woman from her creator. · 24 August 06

The Evil Inc. blog pointed at this review of the creation of Wonder Woman. The interview includes multiple direct quotes from Wonder Woman creator William Moulton Marston. Turns out that WMM (a psychologist) was using the Wonder Woman comic as a vehicle for a message: Marston believed that submission to “loving authority” was the key to overcoming mankind’s violent urges.

I don’t want to spoil the rest of the article, but let’s just say it gets even more interesting from there…

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: epiphanies

This series makes me miss playing role-playing games. · 17 August 06

While checking out RPG.net’s homepage I spotted a series called, Keeping Kosher. I read article #25: Player Pet Peeves, article #23: Using Props, and article #21: Classroom Management. They’re just chock-full of good advice, and they reminded me of what I really like about playing RPGs.

If I just had the time to do it on a regular basis again…

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: gaming : epiphanies

Juggernauts - Game of the Month for August '06 · 7 August 06

The Game of the Month for August 2006 is Juggernauts. Juggernauts is a non-collectible, customizable card game for two players. You’re the Commander of a massive, sprawling, dynamically reconfigurable battle platform. Your goal is to use your Juggernaut to defend your territory by incapacitating your opponent’s Juggernaut so your ground forces can approach it safely and overwhelm it.

Juggenrauts uses custom cards (which you can downlaod from us for free, of course), assorted tokens, and polyhedral dice. A two-player game takes about 30 minutes to play. Juggernauts is appropriate for ages 12 and up.

Juggernauts is different from our usual offerings for three reasons:

1) Because Juggernauts is a customizable card game, there are many different possible strategies. You can build a Juggernaut that’s small and quick (and fragile) or large and slow (and robust). You can build a Juggernaut that has lots of powerful attacks, strong defenses, specialized crew and deployment forces, electromagnetic neutralizers, chained effect triggers… There are lots of deck construction options.

2) Because Juggernauts is non-collectible, you can print out as many cards and build as many decks as you want to.

3) Because Juggernauts is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License, you can make up new cards and create effects that no-one has ever seen before. I know it’s tempting to make uber-powerful cards, but keep in mind that if your cards are cheesy, no-one’ll want to duel you again (or they might just copy your cards and use them against you). If you make up cards that are super-keen, please let me know about ‘em; if we get enough new cards, we’ll create a page of “officially sanctioned” Juggernauts cards so you can know what’s kosher.

Enjoy!

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: gaming : epiphanies

My favorite self-contradictory statement... · 29 May 06

My favorite self-contradictory statement is, “All generalizations are wrong.” Get it?

— Jonathan A Leistiko :: humor : epiphanies

Copyright 1999 - 2009 Invisible City Productions